November 13, 2019 | by: markfirth

cknb news update wednesday november 13 2019

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CAM – SNOW ISSUES
The snow came fast and created some slippery road conditions for the area.

All schools were cancelled for both boards yesterday with some accidents
reported due to the conditions.

One accident had Campbellton Fire on the scene of a vehicle roll over on Val
d’Amour Road… no word on injuries.

The weather looks a little better for today with conditions expected to
improve but still some wind gusts that will make for a cold day.

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CAM – BABY SERVICES OPEN SOON
Women should be able to start giving birth again at the Campbellton Regional
Hospital tomorrow/today (WED 13) after a five day shut down.

Vitalite Heath had said in a release the shut down was due to a lack of a
pediatrician.

Women were referred for delivery and specialized services to the Chaleur
Regional Hospital in Bathurst about an hours drive away.

The department is scheduled to be open today/tomorrow (WED 13) at 8 am. The
health network says women 36 weeks pregnant or more have been notified.

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CAM – VITALITE PUBLIC CONSULT

Vitalite Heath has announced they have started a public consultation program
that will run till November 22nd.

In a release the network says the move is designed to help redesign the
organizations priorities for the next three years.

An online confidential questionaire on the networks website is being used to
gather comments on priorities, issues, and areas for action.

Targeted interviews with partners such as employees, physicians, and
educational institutions will also take place as part of the consultation.

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CAM – HERON POP GOOD
The coast of Maine is reporting a decline in the population of Great Blue
Herons, but research along the Bay of Chaleur indicates growth of the bird.

Samantha Bayard of Environment Canada tells the Tribune results of a recent
Breeding Bird Survey show the Great Blue Heron is strong in the area.

Bayard says even with Bald Eagles becoming more common in Restigouche the
heron doesn’t appear to be affected by the apex predator.

Transmitters fitted on Heron’s in Maine show some coming to the Chaleur
region for the summer and bypassing the state to winter in Cuba.

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