February 6, 2019 | by: markfirth

CKNB NEWS UPDATE WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 6 2019

*CAMP PUFF THE MAGIC DRAGON  RF/TRIB

The marijauna-growing facility in Atholville will increase its workforce to
400 to meet the extra demand of a new supply agreement with Shoppers Drug
Mart to sell medical marijuana products online, according to the Tribune.

In addition, the company is working closely with the Listuguj First Nation,
just across the Restigouche River in Quebec, to train people for many of the
jobs.

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*CAMP IT’S A GAS-GAS-GAS  RF/TRIB

The smell of propane at 100 Water Street in Campbellton led to an evacuation
yesterday (Tuesday) morning.

Fire Chief Rick MacNaughton told the Tribune that tenants were allowed back
in, once emergency crews determined that it was probably a truck that was
there filling the tank and there was a bit of smell from that.

—-
*CAMP CHARLO FLYING HIGH  RF/AIRPORT

The Charlo Regional Airport did well last year, with just over 21 hundred
people flying in and out.

That’s up by 23 per cent, compared to 2017.

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CAM/NB-Shoppers and Cannabis                    (cbc tue.noon)

Shoppers Drug Mart is getting into the canabis business with a new Brusnwick
based company

Shoppers has signed a deal with Zenabis, based in Atholville outside of
Campbellton, to supply dried cannabis buds and eventually cannabis oil and
other products for medical marijuanna prescriptions. The products will be
sold online for now as currently pharmacies are prohibited from selling
medical cannabis in stores.

Zenabis will ramp up this year at its plant in Atholville, expanding the work
force there to about 400 from the current 150 employees.

NB SHOTS FIRED  RF/RCMP

The West District RCMP is looking for information regarding a suspect after
shots were fired outside of a business on the Tobique First Nation early
Monday morning.

Officers dealt with a report of gunshots outside of a bar on Main Street.

Just after closing, an employee was confronted by a man wearing a mask and
brandishing a gun.

An altercation ensued and shots were fired.

The employee made it back inside the building. No one was hurt.

The suspect is approximately five feet, ten inches (178 centimetres) tall,
with a thin build, and was dressed all in black, including a black mask,
black gloves and work boots.

—-
*NB RESIGNATION  RF/EMAIL

After eight years, Executive Director Alissa Lee will be stepping down from
her role at the Stan Cassidy Foundation effective at the end of March.

The board of directors has begun the process to select a new Executive
Director and will work with Lee to manage an effective and seamless
transition for the Foundation’s work.

The Stan Cassidy Foundation is a registered charity that directly benefits
the day-to-day lives of Stan Cassidy patients and their families by raising
funds for direct patient support programs, research and education, and
building and equipment.

—-
*NB EHS WORRIES  RF/CBC

Ambulance New Brunswick told a committee of MLAs that it has never taken an
ambulance out of service because of a lack of bilingual paramedics.

Matt Crossman, Medavie’s vice-president for Ambulance New Brunswick, danced
around Tory politicians who have blamed ambulance delays on bilingual hiring
requirements.

Crossman was responding to a question from Tory MLA Stewart Fairgrieve, who
said he was aware of “speculation” that vacant bilingual-designated positions
were to blame for parked ambulances.

—-
NB/SJ-Oland-Murder                        (wire wed.am)

The judge in the Dennis Oland trial heard yesterday that Oland was deeply in
debt on the day his multimillionaire father, Richard, was beaten to death.

The fifty year old had maxed out most of his personal accounts despite having
raised credit limits by thousands of dollars in the months prior to Richard
Oland’s killing. The prosecution is trying to establish a financial motive
for the killing.

The defence position is that since Dennis Oland was used to being in debt,
and always seemed to be able to get credit increases or advances at work, the
financial issue does not work as a motive.

MAN MURDERED BY HIS FOSTER CHILD  RF/
52-year-old Tony Paonessa, a Niagara Falls (Ontario) man, died in hospital
after allegedly being attacked by his 17 year old foster child.

Paonessa was described by his family as “the good guy.”

Police were called to the area of Huggins street and Gainsborough Avenue for
reports of a serious assault.

Officers found Paonessa suffering from life-threatening injuries.

A 17 year old man, who was his foster child, was found shortly after and
initially charged with aggravated assault.

Under the youth criminal justice act, the 17 year old can’t be identified,
but police say he is now facing a charge of second degree murder.

—-
ANOTHER HOCKEY BRAWL  RF

It looks like some hockey parents are the ones who need to cool off in the
sin bin.

The Ontario Provincial Police in Norfolk county were called to a Simcoe arena
on Sunday night as around 30 parents began to brawl.

It all started with an argument that spiralled out of control.

The crowd of parents dispersed before police could arrive, and there were no
reports of any injuries.

—-
TRUMP SOTU  RF/VARIOUS

U-S President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union address to
Congress last (Tuesday) night, concluding his speech by urging Americans to
choose greatness.

His speech was met with applause and standing ovations at all times by
Republicans, and only once in a while by Democrats.

Trump also drew a hearty round of applause for his statement of “Let us
reaffirm a fundemental truth, all children, born and unborn, are made in the
holy image of God.”

He added that America would never become a socialist nation.

—-
-Indigenous-Languages                    (wire wed.am)

A national Inuit organization is disappointed in the Trudeau Government’s new
legislation meant to protect Indigenous languages.

The Liberals tabled the bill yesterday to promote Indigenous languages, which
Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez said are on the verge of disappearing
without any intervention.

The Assembly of First Nations and Metis National Council are calling the bill
a landmark piece of legislation, But the Inuit say the legislation lacks any
Inuit-specific content and doesn’t address Inuit rights to speak their
traditional language, or help to revive and promote it.