August 28, 2019 | by: markfirth

CKNB NEWS UPDATE WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28 2019

CAM – WILDLIFE FUNDRAISER

The first ever Canadian Wild Turkey Federation banquet will be taking place
in September to get out people talking and thinking about wildlife
preservation.

Terry Landry from the group tells the Tribune they are more about
conservation and outdoor activities than wild turkey and the banquet will
show this philosophy while raising funds for their work.

Landry would also like to see more member as the more voices deciding the
future of hunting, fishing and trapping in the region the better.

The Restigouche council of the federation will be holding the banquet on
September 14th at the Lions Club.

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CAM – ZENABIS BEVERAGES

Zenabis Global, which has a plant in Atholville has signed a deal to produce
cannabis-infused beverages and other infused products.

In a release the rapidly growing cannibas producer says they have signed a
deal with a Canadian beverage technology company that will see them make
products that will have onset times of less than five minutes.

Chief Executive Officer of Zenabis Andrew Grieve went on to say the Canadian
market for such infused beverages is estimated to be worth
530-million-dollars.

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CAM – POW WOW TURNOUT

The Eel River Bar First Nation Pow Wow last weekend was a huge success with
hundreds of people in attendance.

The celebration of Mi’gmaq culture and heritage took place over Saturday and
Sunday on the Pow Wow grounds at the Aboriginal Heritage Gardens.

According to the Tribune, drummers and dancers from Quebec, Nova Scotia, and
New Brunswick were on hand in full regalia to show the crowd traditional
music and movements.

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CAM/MIR – ROPELESS NOT GOOD

The ropeless trap technology for the snow crab fishery in the Gulf designed
to help protect right whales isn’t going over well with its users.

CBC reports the technology holds the rope in a bag on the bottom, crews are
then able to send a signal to release the rope that floats to the top to
harvest the trap.

After one round of testing fishers had several issues including the time it
takes for the rope to float to the top and how difficult reloading the rope
bag was.

Robert Haché, director general of the Acadian Crabbers Association says
fishers aren’t sold on ropeless until it improves and will turn to other
protection devices such as lighter traps and weaker ropes.

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