July 4, 2019 | by: markfirth

CKNB NEWS UPDATE THURSDAY JULY 4 2019

 

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NB – FIRST NATION LAWSUITS


Two northern New Brunswick First Nations are suing the Canadian government to
gain access to the commercial snow crab fishery.

CBC reports Tobique and Madawaska First Nations have filed for permanent
access to the fisheries and damages for lost revenues dating back to 1995.

Chief Patricia Bernard of Madawaska First Nation says they’ve tried asking
with letters and making arguments but have been met with nothing but
disrespect.

The statement of claim says the federal government wrongfully restricted the
bands access to the fishery and deprived them of their ability to fish.

The government has not yet commented on… or filed a response to the suits.

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CAM – PARKING WORRIES

Campbellton’s Public Protective Services Committee met on Tuesday and heard
concerns about parking.

Parking by the Pizza Delight restaurant on Sugarloaf Street near the
intersection with Duncan Street was brought up as a major accident waiting to
happen.

According to the Tribune the area was brought up a couple of years ago and
Councillor Marco Savoie wants to know if there has been any progress on it.

CAO Manon Cloutier says the matter was referred to the Department of
Transporation, when it was first brought up but nothing came of it.  His
latest effort to speak to the department about the cities options have not
yielded a response yet.

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CAM – FIRE CALLS

Campbellton’s Public Protective Services Committee heard on Tuesday that the
Campbellton Fire Department has seen a record number of calls so far this
year.

The Tribune reports Fire chief Rick MacNaughton told the committee the
department has seen almost 100 calls already.

Most were false alarms, but three structure fires were included and over 20
motor vehicle accidents.

RCMP Sgt. Rene Labbe also presented to the group saying nothing extrodinary
has taken place this year, while answering general questions from
councillors.

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NB-Nursing home update

The chief justice of the New Brunswick Court of Queen’s Bench Tracy Deware
has ruled a law making nursing home workers an essential service is
unconstitutional….but they can’t strike just yet.

Justice DeWare agreed to a provincial request to delay the impact of the
ruling until January to allow the government time to make the law comply with
the Charter of Rights.

Social Development Minister Dorothy Shepard meanwhile issued a statement
saying the judge’s decision is being reviewed, leaving open the possibility
of a further appeal to a higher court.

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NB – CARTOONIST NOT AMUSED


The cartoonist named to replace Michael de Adder after he was let go at
Brunswick News has decided not to take the job after all.

In a statement to CBC, Greg Perry says the social media backlash after BNI
used his name in statements about de Adder, has taken a toll. He says for a
job that pays the same as a job in a grocery store, he woudn’t wish this on
anyone.

Perry did confirm what BNI said… he was contacted weeks ago about working
for the company, long before de Adder claims he was let go because of a
controversial Donald Trump cartoon showing him standing over two dead
migrants.

Meanwhile, de Adder agreed with BNI saying it wasn’t that particular cartoon
that got him fired but feels his online presence, including other anti-Trump
messages, ultimately resulted in the end of his contract.

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NB – NB FRENCH IN AFRICA

With the success of New Brunswick’s english curriculum in several
international schools, the french program is now going to Africa.

École Canadienne de Sousse (SUE-SA) l’Acadie in Port El Kantaoui (CAN-TOWEE),
Tunisia will be using the New Brunswick french curriculum in its
international school.

Sophie Lacroix from the Department of Education and Early Childhood
Development tells Radio Canada it gives the province credibility and may
attract students to New Brunswick universities.

There are already English-language schools teaching the provincial curriculum
in several areas including Brazil and China.

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NB-Strawberry-Delays

The cool, wet spring has delayed an early summertime treart…fresh
strawberrries.

Farmer Christian Michaud of Bouctouche says the berries are now a few weeks
behind schedule. He says some of his crops have barely budged in growth for
over a week now, and customers hoping for fresh local fruits and vegetables
are going to have to wait.

U-pick farm owner Jean Francois Michaud says the problem is simply “no
heat.”

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